Based in Canada. Free shipping to Canada & USA on orders of $100+ and free shipping to the rest of the world on orders of $150+
Based in Canada. Free shipping to Canada & USA on orders of $100+ and free shipping to the rest of the world on orders of $150+
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Grass Fed Beef Liver (Bundle of 3)
Grass Fed Beef Liver (Bundle of 3)
Grass Fed Beef Liver (Bundle of 3)
Grass Fed Beef Liver (Bundle of 3)
Nutrimal Supplements Inc.

Grass Fed Beef Liver (Bundle of 3)

Regular price $120.00 Sale price $150.00 Unit price per

Grass Fed Freeze Dried Beef Liver

Serving size: 4 capsules, 750mg per capsule.

3000mg of our product is equivalent to roughly 28 grams (1 serving) of Beef Liver.

Nutrition Facts

Vitamin A - 157% of RDA

Vitamin B6 - 24% of RDA

Vitamin B12 - 701% of RDA

Iron - 18% of RDA

Phosphorus - 11% of RDA

Zinc - 8% of RDA

Copper - 139% of RDA

Manganese - 5% of RDA

Selenium - 17% of RDA

Riboflavin - 46% of RDA

Niacin - 19% of RDA

Folate - 21% of RDA

Choline - 18% of RDA

* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs.

Why Beef Liver?

So you might be wondering what's so special about beef liver? Simply put, it is the most potent superfood on the planet, and its not even particularly close if you take into account it's nutrient profile.

What are these nutrients?

  • Retinol (Pre formed Vitamin A)
  • Copper
  • Vitamin C
  • Hyaluronic Acid
  • B Vitamins
  • Choline
  • CoQ10
  • Magnesium
  • And many more...

What do these nutrients do in the body?

Retinol

  • Supports thyroid health.
  • Supports healthy immune function.
  • Allows the body to use Copper which in turn allows your body to use Iron properly.

Copper

  • Supports energy production by aiding the body in generating ATP.
  • Regulates iron which allows the body to utilize oxygen properly.

Vitamin C

  • Supports healthy immune function.
  • Powerful antioxidant that limits damaging effects of free radicals.
  • Required to create collagen, which is an essential component of connective tissue and wound healing.
  • Supports the recycling of Vitamin E, which detoxes polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Hyaluronic Acid

  • Promotes healthy, supple skin.
  • Plays key role in wound healing.
  • Relieves and helps prevent joint pain.
  • May aid in the prevention of bone loss.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

  • Supports energy production by transferring energy from carbs fats and proteins into ATP, the cell’s primary energy currency.
  • Required for gene expression, cellular communication, and maintenance of genome integrity.
  • Helps the body synthesize cholesterol and fatty acids.
  • Plays a critical role in maintaining cellular antioxidant function.

Vitamin B9 (Folate)

  • Required in the formation and repair of DNA.
  • Required to metabolize amino acids.
  • Required for proper cell division.
  • Deficiency can result in megaloblastic anemia.

Vitamin B12

  • Required for the development, myelination, and function of the central nervous system.
  • Required for healthy red blood cell formation.
  • Required for DNA synthesis.

Magnesium

  • Cofactor in over 300 enzymatic systems within the body.
  • Supports protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation.
  • Required for energy production.
  • Supports structural development of bone.
  • Required to synthesize DNA, RNA, and the antioxidant glutathione.
  • Plays important role in nerve impulse conduction, muscle contraction, and normal heart rhythm.

Choline

  • Supports healthy cell membranes.
  • Required to produce acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter for memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions.
  • Plays important role in modulating gene expression, cell membrane signaling, lipid transport and metabolism, and early brain development.

CoQ10

  • Supports healthy growth and maintenance of cells.
  • Acts as an antioxidant.

When people first hear or read that liver is a potent superfood, it is often met with confusion, but no food on the planet truly has all these nutrients in such high amounts, while at the same time being extremely bioavailable to humans. This food really is a one stop shop, so the question is why isn’t everyone consuming it regularly? Is it because of lack of awareness, or palatability? The truth is that it’s both of those things. While most people generally are unaware of just how nutrient dense this food is, the earthy taste and texture can be quite off putting to some, in addition to the idea that you are eating an organ, rather than muscle meat which most people are accustomed to. This is where supplementation comes in, with Nutrimal LiveRestore you get all the nutritive benefits, without the taste or smell, in a convenient, easy to take pill form! This is how we take tried and true foods that stood the test of time and combine it with the luxury of modern science to bring you the nutrition you need, without all the hassle.

References:

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